Apr 252019
 

Bass Drum of Death- Just Business

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (4/24-4/27/19)-

Thursday

For MOCA’s 40th Anniversary they are hosting a series of exhibitions organized by LA based artists and MOCA curators with work drawn from their permanent collection. Tonight multimedia artist Elliot Hundley will lead a walkthrough of his exhibition Open House: Elliott Hundley at the Grand Avenue location (free tonight and every Thursday evening)

At Art+Practice, multidisciplinary artists Alima Lee and Kya Lou will be discussing their individual practices as well as their process and experiences documenting black life in Los Angeles. This talk is part of the programming for the exhibition Time is Running Out of Time: Experimental Film and Video from the L.A. Rebellion and Today.

Olden Yolk and The Lentils are opening for Chris Cohen at Lodge Room

Feels are playing with Ex Hex at the Teragram Ballroom

Artist Stan Douglas will be speaking at Hammer Museum

Local Natives are playing a free show at Amoeba Records in Hollywood

Artist and director Marie Voignier will be at LAXART to discuss her film Tinselwood, currently on view at the gallery

 

Friday

Bass Drum of Death are playing at Lodge Room with Jimmy Whispers opening

Hand Habits are playing at the Bootleg Theater with Lomelda and Tasha opening

The Dodgers are playing the Pittsburgh Pirates at Dodger Stadium with fireworks to follow

Bikini Kill are playing at the Hollywood Palladium

Slick Rick will be at Amoeba Records in Hollywood to celebrate and sign copies of The Great Adventures Of Slick Rick for its 30th Anniversary

 

Friday through Sunday

For the first time Photoville, the free annual photo festival with galleries built from repurposed shipping containers, is heading to Los Angeles. It will be taking place at the Annenberg Space for Photography this weekend and next with programming that includes nighttime projections, talks, workshops, family activities and a beer garden. At the same time the exhibition CONTACT HIGH: A Visual History of Hip-Hop, which showcases the work of hip hop photographers, will open at Annenberg Space for Photography with special hours to coincide with the festival.

 

Saturday

Artist Lia Halloran will be at Luis de Jesus Los Angeles at 2pm to discuss her exhibition Double Horizon

Dream Phases and Franky Flowers are playing at The House of Machines

The artists of Keystone Art Space are having an open studio night from 6-10pm

White Denim are playing at the Teragram Ballroom

Automatic and Gomme are playing at The Monty Bar

Arcana Books is hosting a launch party from 4-6pm for issue 2 of Creative Director Alexander McWhirter’s thematic annual art and fashion journal, Public.

Compltr is playing at All Star Lanes with Sheer, Trends, and June Swoon

 

Saturday and Sunday

Grand Park is hosting the free two day festival, Grand Park’s Our L.A. Voices- a Pop-up Arts+Culture Fest, featuring short film, dance, music, spoken word and theatre performances, and visual art, created by L.A. artists. There will also be a marketplace with artwork for sale.

Jackalope are bringing their free local artisan Spring Fair to Old Pasadena’s Central Park

 

Sunday

Celebrate the Thai New Year all day at the Songkran Festival in Thai Town which includes a parade, beauty pageant, live music, dance performances, food, and more

Emily Wells is playing the Bootleg Theater with KERA opening

Zebulon has a free screening of Jim Jarmusch’s Dead Man

Telekinesis are playing at the Moroccan Lounge with SONTALK and The Pretty Flowers

Big Red Machine (Justin Vernon (Bon Iver) and Aaron Dessner of The National) are performing at the Hollywood Palladium

Apr 242019
 

Today thousands of people in Los Angeles, the largest Armenian community outside of Armenia, participated in marches in honor of Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day.

The Armenian Genocide began on April 24, 1915 and continued through 1923 during which 1.5 million Armenians were killed by the Ottoman Government. Today the Turkish government, as well as the governments of the United States, United Kingdom, and Israel, still do not recognize the massacre as a genocide.

The above mural was created in 2014 in Los Angeles’ Little Armenia neighborhood by artist Arutyun Gozukuchikyan, who at the time went by ArtViaArt and now goes by Artoon. The mural has since been removed.

For more of Artoon’s work, check out his website and Instagram.

 

Apr 242019
 

TOTAL youth, 2019

TOTAL youth (side view), 2019

Sea Within A Sea, 2019

Sea Within A Sea, 2019 (side view)

“…We are constantly changing and rearranging our point of view. Tomorrow we will remember yesterday. The abstraction is real, more real than nature…” (punctuation mine)- text from Willie Stewart’s video Love Song (2019)

Nostalgia is something we all live with to a greater or lesser extent. The past informs our present and how we perceive things. Why do we see things the way we do? How do we frame the things we see and put them together?

For Willie Stewart’s exhibition In Between Days at Morán Morán gallery, he recreated VHS tapes, album covers, 1970s wood paneling, flowers, paintings of flowers, and more, through layers of detailed painting combined with sculpture. Their titles reference songs from bands like Depeche Mode, Germs, The Horrors, and The Cure and add additional meaning to the content of the work. Within the text of the video in the exhibition. they change their context once again.

The perception of the viewer adds yet another layer when they make their own connections based on personal associations with the objects in the work. In that way, the meaning often becomes less about the work at face value, and more about the meaning you bring to it. For some it may be no more than just an admiration of the beauty and skill of the work. Maybe it won’t resonate to some at all. But for others who remember VHS tapes more vividly or know the bands referenced, the nostalgia adds an extra appreciation.

This exhibition closes 4/27/19.

Apr 192019
 

Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas, Juchitán, Mexico, 1979

Señor de los Pájaros, Nayarit, Mexico, 1984 (image courtesy of Rose Gallery)

Currently at Rose Gallery is Graciela Iturbide: Hay Tiempo, an exhibition of beautiful photographs by the Mexican photographer.

From the press release

Graciela Iturbide, celebrated as one of Mexico’s most prolific and distinguished photographers, observes with patience and exhibits her world with beauty, serenity and dignity. Born into a conservative family in Mexico City, Iturbide decided to create her own path, leaving a traditional domestic life to pursue the arts. During her studies in cinematography at the Universidad Nacional Autonama de Mexico, she became the achichinle (the assistant) to Manuel Alvarez Bravo, the distinguished Mexican photographer who later became a lifelong mentor to Iturbide. In their time together, Álvarez Bravo constantly reminded Iturbide to pause and observe, asserting Hay Tiempo (There is Time). This patience to allow the moment to unravel and reveal itself echoed the notion of a Mexican poetic tempo, which is present throughout Mexican art, literature and life. Iturbide came to understand and employ her mentor’s slow, observational process as she photographed many cultures and spheres.

Although Iturbide has photographed all over the world, she is widely known for the photographs she has taken in her native Mexico. While many twentieth-century photographers had documented Mexico through an outsider’s lens, shining light on poverty and politics in a neocolonial gesture, Iturbide reached beyond the document, photographing the poetic essence embedded in each moment. With Hay Tiempo in mind, she evokes a lyricism in her careful observations. In the late 1970s under an assignment for the INI (Instituto Nacional Indigenista), Iturbide photographed the Seri tribe, focusing her lens on Mexico’s indigenous population which was often overlooked and marginalized. In these portraits, the deep cultural and spiritual history of indigenous peoples exists alongside the influences of colonialism and an encroaching globalism. Then, in 1979, the celebrated Mexican artist Francisco Toledo invited Iturbide to photograph his native city Juchitan in the southern state of Oaxaca, where she encountered the strength and independence of the Zapotec women. In this indigenous, matriarchal community, the women live economically and socially independent lives in a stark contrast to the customs of westernized Mexico that Iturbide grew up within. Iturbide’s photographs, equally grounded and imaginative, portray the power and spirit of each individual. Their direct presence in the image exhibits the persevering dignity of the indigenous people in a post-colonial world. Iturbide’s photographs of Mexico show not only the diverse and rich cultural history of her nation, but also the resonance of Iturbide’s own artistic community, which invited and encouraged the photographer to explore her own nation in its multiplicities of experience.

This exhibition closes 4/20/19.

Apr 182019
 

Wand- Bee Karma

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (4/18-4/21/19)-

Thursday

Miami based artist Jamilah Sabur joins Los Angeles based artist Michael Queenland in conversation at the Hammer Museum in conjunction with her Hammer Projects exhibition.

UCLA Film & Television Archive and Vidiots are having a special screening of Heathers at The Theatre at Ace Hotel with a post screening conversation with director Michael Lehmann, screenwriter Daniel Waters, and co-star, Lisanne Falk aka Heather McNamara

Randy Randall of No Age will be at Zebulon to perform Sound Volume One, a series of soundscapes inspired by the westward path of the I-10 through Southern California, from downtown LA to Santa Monica. It will be accompanied by an immersive multi-room audio visual installation done in collaboration with visual artist Aaron Farley.

The Egyptian Theatre is showing The Juniper Tree, which stars Björk in her first screen performance

 

Friday

Wand are playing at the Echoplex with Sun Araw and Automatic opening

Omara Portuondo (Buena Vista Social Club) will be performing at The Regent Theater

Lebowski Fest’s Movie and Music Party is happening at The Wiltern with a screening of The Big Lebowski and performances by Jeff Bridges & The Abiders and Trainwreck featuring Kyle Gass of Tenacious D

Superorganism are playing at The Roxy Theatre with Simpson opening

Odd Nights returns to The Autry for its monthly event with evening access to the galleries, food trucks, a market, live music and more ($5)

Rosey Dust is having a record release party at the Monty Bar with Justus Proffit also performing

Antarctigo Vespucci and Pllush are opening for AJJ at the Troubadour

 

Saturday

Fanclub and Prism Tats are playing a free (but RSVP) show at Gold Diggers

There are a few free entrance days a year for the National Parks and today is one of them. It’s also National Park Week with events in several parks.

Zebulon is hosting Sensorium-Sonic Integration and Elevated Sensory Experience, which includes a modular sound bath, tarot readings, and a company giving out CBD samples

For the launch of the book The Los Angeles Tapes: Alan Solomon’s Interviews with Kauffman, Bell, Turrell, and Irwin, Hauser and Wirth will be hosting a conversation between artist Larry Bell and the book’s editor, Matthew Simms (free but RSVP)

Olvera Street’s annual Blessing of The Animals, an event that has taken place since its founding in 1930, starts at 2pm

Shred 420 is happening at The Echo and Echoplex with a variety of performers including Grateful Shred, Sammy Brue, Kirin J Callinan, Pinky Pinky, and more

 

Sunday

The Aero’s double feature for this Easter evening is Donnie Darko and The Evil Dead

Douse, Shit Giver and Band Aparte are playing a free show at The Hi Hat

420 Fest is happening at The Wiltern with a screening of Friday, vendors, a vinyl DJ set and more

There’s a free screening of Jim Jarmusch’s Mystery Train at Zebulon

Apr 122019
 

Annie Leibovitz. The Early Years, 1970 – 1983: Archive Project No. 1 at Hauser and Wirth Los Angeles, is an engrossing look into the beginnings of a photographer who is now one of the most famous in the world. The exhibition, curated by Leibovitz herself, features more than 4,000 photographs. Despite that large number, the layout keeps it from feeling overwhelming. Photographs are put together on the walls by theme and time period. As you wander from room to room looking at the often recognizable faces, Leibovitz’s distinct style emerges.

The early sections of the show give the viewer a chance to see Annie Leibovitz as a young artist just starting out and developing her way of looking at the world through a camera. On one wall is a collage of photos creating a panorama of the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris. She took it when she realized she was standing where Henri Cartier-Bresson, one of the photographers she most admired, had once stood to photograph that same bridge. The sense of excitement she felt at that moment informs the image she would later take of Cartier-Bresson himself. That portrait is included on another wall with images of other photographers and artists she admired.

Walking from room to room, the famous faces blend together with the history of the time period. Political protests, music festivals and tours, presidential campaigns, Nixon’s resignation, Warhol’s factory- she was there documenting what was happening, often in unique ways. Her ability to observe and capture moments without intruding in her subject’s personal space remains present whether it is a rock star, politician, or a member of her own family.

As the show moves through Leibovitz’s timeline, her increased focus on the portraiture that would make her famous emerges. Her staged photographs from the 1980s of celebrities including Keith Haring, Whoopi Goldberg, and Meryl Streep appear. The transition makes logistical sense as this progression of her career is made clear by all the work that came before. Her portraits are the works that stand out the most, even at the beginning.

The exhibition captures an incredible period of time in both the artist’s work and the history of America. Make sure to leave a lot of time to see it before it closes on 4/14/19.

 

Apr 112019
 

Prettiest Eyes- Don’t Call

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (4/11-4/14/19)-

Thursday

Skirball is hosting the panel discussion Black is Beautiful: Then and Now in conjunction with the opening of Black is Beautiful: The Photography of Kwame Brathwaite. The panel includes the artist’s son and director of the Kwame Brathwaite Archive, Kwame S. Brathwaite, along with fashion designer Mimi Plange, photographer Tyler Mitchell, and costume designer Ruth Carter. ($20)

Goon are playing with Dead Soft at the Moroccan Lounge

MOCA Grand Avenue is hosting BlackStar Film Festival. The screening to be followed by a discussion with the founder Maori Karmael Holmes (free)

Damon & Naomi are playing at Zebulon with Exploding Flowers

Wicca Phase Springs Eternal is playing at the Echoplex with Horse Head and MIRSY

 

Friday

ICA LA is hosting Art Buzz, a happy hour tour of Patty Chang: The Wandering Lake with curator Jamillah James and Director of Learning and Engagement Asuka Hisa, with refreshments to follow

Prettiest Eyes are playing at El Cid with Meatbodies, Chud, and The Chonks

Drugdealer is performing at the Teragram Ballroom

 

Friday through Sunday

Printed Matter’s LA Art Book Fair 2019 is happening at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. The free event includes conversations, workshops, performances and other programs and is a great place to find and purchase art books.

 

Saturday

Bergamot Station is having a Spring Open House, a free event with opening receptions, artist talks, and more

Curator David J. Getsy will be giving a public lecture at West Hollywood City Council Chambers titled Rubbish and Dreams: The Genderqueer Performance Art of Stephen Varble in 1970s New York, from 2-4:30pm. The talk is in conjunction with the exhibit he curated for ONE GalleryThe Gutter Art of Stephen Varble: Genderqueer Performance in the 1970s, Photographs by Greg Day. A Q&A with Getsy will follow the lecture.

Independent music stores will celebrate Record Store Day with exclusive releases and events. Amoeba Records in Hollywood will have gift bags, live silk screening, and guest DJ sets

Emily Reo is having a record release party at Junior High with performances by Foxes in Fiction and Lush Agave

Old school hip hop legends Eric B. & Rakim are performing at The Novo

 

Saturday and Sunday

The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books returns to the USC Campus with tons of free and ticketed events and readings, plus music, chef demos, booksellers, and more.

 

Sunday

Zebulon continues their month of free screenings of Jim Jarmusch films with Down By Law

Summer Cannibals are playing The Redwood Bar & Girl

Cruz de Navajas are playing with Pelada, All Your Sisters, Some Ember and Temple of Angeles at the Echoplex

Apr 052019
 

Currently at Hauser & Wirth’s Los Angeles location is Piero Manzoni. Materials of His Time.

From the press release

Piero Manzoni. Materials of His Time is the first exhibition with the gallery and the first in Los Angeles in over 20 years devoted to the seminal figure of postwar Italian Art and progenitor of Conceptualism. Curated by Rosalia Pasqualino di Marineo, director of the Piero Manzoni Foundation in Milan, this exhibition focuses on Manzoni’s revolutionary approach to unconventional materials through the exploration of what he dubbed ‘Achromes’ – paintings without color. Over 70 ‘Achromes’ will be on view, comprised of such materials as sewn cloth, cotton balls, fiberglass, synthetic and natural fur, straw, cobalt chloride, polystyrene, stones, and more. The exhibition situates Manzoni as a peer of such artists as Lucio Fontana and Yves Klein, whose experiments continue to influence contemporary art-making today. ‘Materials of His Time’ will also present, for the first time, the items on a wish list Manzoni outlined in a 1961 letter to his friend Henk Peeters: a room all in white fur, and another coated in fluorescent paint, totally immersing the visitor in white light.

The “Achromes” are simple but pleasing in their graphic simplicity. Lacking in color, they stand out against the soothing muted colors of the walls.

Heading upstairs, there’s something so delightful about stepping into the white fur room that fulfills Manzoni’s dream. The room itself has a white felt floor and fake fur lines the walls, ceiling and door. It may not be as thrilling now that installation art is more common in museums and galleries, but after reading the artist’s quote, knowing he got his wish makes it much more special. The artist died in 1963 at the young age of 29, too soon to see how much would change in the art world. Also, after seeing an exhibition that focuses on objects with so many different textures, having a chance to touch the furry walls is oddly satisfying.

This exhibition closes 4/7/19.