Mar 292024
 

“The Last Supper”, 1986, Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen

In the 1980s Andy Warhol created a series of paintings based around Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper. The one above is currently on view at The Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

In 2010 it was on view as part of the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition Andy Warhol: The Last Decade.

From their website about the work-

The Last Supper series was commissioned to inaugurate a new gallery in Milan, Italy, located across the street from the site of the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci’s iconic fresco (circa 1495–98) depicting Jesus’s last meal with his followers. Warhol worked obsessively for more than a year on this series, producing more than a hundred Last Supper paintings, both silkscreened and hand-painted, that were some of the largest paintings of his career.

Despite his public proclamations to the contrary, Warhol was profoundly moved by the series. Of these works, he remarked, “I painted them all by hand—I myself; so now I’ve become a Sunday painter. . . . That’s why the project took so long. But I worked with a passion.” These paintings manifest both his religious beliefs—his practice of Catholicism remained private until it was revealed at his funeral—and an irreverence toward the subject, expressed through ironic commercial logos and transgressive repetitions of Christ’s image.

Warhol created many variations using versions and pieces of da Vinci’s fresco and there is some debate as to the meanings behind them. In 2018, curator Jessica Beck wrote Warhol’s Confession: Love, Faith, and AIDs, an in-depth essay exploring possible meanings behind the work. She suggests Warhol was referencing AIDS, suffering, health, and mortality, along with his relationship to Christianity.

In this section of the essay she discusses the imagery from the painting-

The tension between Warhol’s sexuality and his religious life has its fullest expression in paintings such as The Last Supper (The Big C), in which signs and symbols create a private reference to AIDS. Hand-painted via a projection process, like paintings of 1961–62 such as Before and After, Wigs, and Dr. Scholl’s Corns, the canvas is left partly unfinished, and Warhol employs a light touch with an abstract brushstroke. On this canvas the figure of Christ recurs four times, while hands appear repeatedly. Thomas’s finger pointing to the sky, intimating that heaven knows he is free of guilt, appears prominently next to the “eye” in the Wise potato-chip logo.

…The source material for the painting, in the archives of The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, is a collage made up of headlines from the New York Post, motorcycle ads, and clippings reading “the Big C” and “AIDS” cut from a front-page article in the Post. Warhol ultimately left out the AIDS headline while keeping the more covert “The Big C,” but given the direct references to “gay cancer” in his diaries, it becomes clear that this image of Christ was connected for him to the rapid rate at which people were dying around him. “The Big C” was synonymous with AIDS. The Last Supper (The Big C) reflects on sex and shame through appropriated images of Christ’s betrayal, the piercing owl’s eye (the Wise logo), and the numbers 699, appropriated from a price tag—$6.99—but indexing both the sexual position “69” and the “mark of the beast,” 666, in the Book of Revelations. Even the details of Christ’s feet at the far right of the canvas seem to point to the notion of punishment: for Steinberg, writing on Leonardo’s Last Supper, “as [Christ’s feet] rejoin the rest of the body, they foreshadow it glorified; and they foreshadow it crucified.”34  The image of Christ offering his flesh in the Eucharist was a symbol of salvation during a time of suffering, an unusually personal and emotional image for Warhol. In keeping with the complexities of his construction of death in the Death and Disasters, and with its repression in the diaries, the painting speaks of sex and of judgment. It is an allegorical triangulation of mourning, punishment, and fear.

For more on Warhol an his diaries, the Netflix documentary is really informative as well as entertaining. It’s a moving portrait that goes beyond what most people know about Warhol, both as an artist and as a person.

Jul 032023
 

There are currently two exhibitions in New York celebrating Richard Avedon’s photography. At The Metropolitan Museum of Art is Richard Avedon: Murals. Pictured above are two of the large murals included. The first is of Andy Warhol and members of The Factory and the other is of members of the Mission Council in Saigon.

From The Met’s website about the show-

In 1969, Richard Avedon was at a crossroads. After a five-year hiatus, the photographer started making portraits again, this time with a new camera and a new sense of scale. Trading his handheld Rolleiflex for a larger, tripod-mounted device, he reinvented his studio dynamic. Instead of dancing around his subjects from behind a viewfinder, as he had in his lively fashion pictures, he could now stand beside a stationary camera and meet them head-on. Facing down groups of the era’s preeminent artists, activists, and politicians, he made huge photomural portraits, befitting their outsized cultural influence. On the centennial of the photographer’s birth, Richard Avedon: MURALS will bring together three of these monumental works, some as wide as 35 feet. For Avedon, the murals expanded the artistic possibilities of photography, radically reorienting viewers and subjects in a subsuming, larger-than-life view.

The murals are society portraits. In them, Avedon assembles giants of the late twentieth century—members of Andy Warhol’s Factory, architects of the Vietnam war, and demonstrators against that war—who together shaped an extraordinarily turbulent era of American life. Presented in one gallery, their enormous portraits will stage an unlikely conversation among historically opposed camps, as well as contemporary viewers. The formal innovations of Avedon’s high style—of starkly lit bodies in an unsparing white surround—are best realized in these works, where subjects jostle and crowd the frame, and bright voids between them crackle with tension. Uniting the murals with session outtakes and contemporaneous projects, the exhibition will track Avedon’s evolving approach to group portraiture, through which he so transformed the conventions of the genre.

About Andy Warhol and members of The Factory

Avedon fantasized about throwing an annual fete for New York society and watching the group evolve over time. This mural is his downtown take on such a party, featuring a new “smart set” of sexual revolutionaries. They were affiliated with Andy Warhol’s Factory, the studio and gathering place for a coterie of avant-garde filmmakers, artists, and socialites. Avedon summoned them to his own studio, where they met over a series of weeks. Working in his most directorial mode, he arranged his subjects—including transgender actress Candy Darling and adult film star Joe Dallesandro—in a lateral frieze across adjoining frames, the fracture and repetition of their bodies in space suggesting the filmic passage of time.

The culmination of much trial and error, the mural’s composition took time to perfect, as evidenced by session outtakes displayed nearby. Avedon later praised the professionalism of his cast but joked, “You couldn’t keep the clothes on anybody in those years. . . . Before you could say ‘hello,’ they were nude and ready to ride.” If this unabashed undress tests gallery decorum, it is a provocation grounded in art history: in the central panel Avedon presents a male version of the “three graces,” riffing on a gendered tradition in allegorical painting with an ironic, Warholian wink.

About The Mission Council, Saigon, South Vietnam

Avedon knew he would have mere minutes to photograph the U.S. generals, ambassadors, and policy experts who ran the war in Vietnam—not the weeks he spent refining his first mural. Planning in advance, he requested the heights of the men known collectively as the Mission Council and mapped out their positions, with careful attention to rank and influence. He rigged a makeshift studio at the embassy in Saigon, and recalled that once assembled, they “lined up like high school boys. They all wanted to be in the picture.” This is true of all but Ted Shackley, the camera-averse CIA station chief known to colleagues as the Blond Ghost, who begged out of the sitting for “a meeting,” leaving a void in the rightmost panel.

As blunt and procedural as a police lineup, the mural recalls Avedon’s first photography gig as a teenager in the Merchant Marine, where he made mugshot-style portraits of new recruits. Here, scrutinizing the faces of the war’s top brass, Avedon invokes their unseen operatives and victims. When the work was later published, one critic deemed it “a terrifying picture of business as usual.”

This exhibition closes 10/1/23.

For a more comprehensive look at Avedon’s career, Gagosian’s Chelsea location is showing Avedon 100, “a collection of Avedon photographs was selected by more than 150 people—including prominent artists, designers, musicians, writers, curators, and fashion world representatives—who elaborate on the impact of the photographer’s work today.”

The gallery’s website has a video of the installation that is well worth checking out, especially if you can’t see the exhibition in person.

This exhibition will close on Friday, 7/7/23.

Feb 132020
 

Part of what makes Andy Warhol such an incredible artist is the variety and volume of work he created in his lifetime. Currently in both of Jack Shainman Gallery‘s locations are a selection of Warhol’s photographs that are not often seen. Photo collages, “stitched photos”, nudes, and, of course, photos of celebrities, come together to give new perspective on Warhol’s work within the medium of photography.

From the press release-

Warhol’s photographic oeuvre remains one of the most central and enduring aspects of his creative process. Initially inspired by commercially available press photos of celebrities, such as iconic images of Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, and Marlon Brando, as well as newspaper photographs of death and disasters, Warhol incorporated photographs as source material for the creation of his silk-screened paintings and prints. With the creation of a singular visual vocabulary, Warhol articulated his sensibilities while conveying his detached, observing eye through the use of a dispassionate machine: the camera.  Photography spanned the entirety of Warhol’s career as he fused numerous genres of photo-making.

By the mid-1960s, Warhol’s eye turned to the moving image as he began making 16mm black and white short films, dubbed Screen Tests, which featured his “Superstar” Factory crew. Several Screen Tests are on view in this exhibition, including films that highlight Factory life, some very early notions of performance art, and the raw visual materials for Lou Reed’s The Velvet Underground EP. These films catalyzed into Warhol’s revolutionary conceptual feature-length films, including Sleep, Empire, and Heat.

Concurrent with his exploration of film, Warhol utilized photobooths in Times Square to create serial images of art dealers, collectors, and bright young creatives who frequented the Factory. These strips became source material for some of Warhol’s most iconic early portraiture, including paintings of art dealer, Holly Solomon, collectors, Judith Green and Edith Skull, and Warhol Superstars, such as Jane Holzer and Edie Sedgwick. Towards the end of the 1960s, Warhol began carrying with him a Polaroid camera used largely to document friends in his inner circle, including Mick Jagger, Diana Vreeland, Lee Radziwill, and Nan Kempner. Warhol referred to the Polaroid camera as “his date” – always with him, a tool for both engaging with his subjects, as well as a distancing mechanism.

In 1977, Warhol’s Swiss dealer, Thomas Ammann, presented him with the gift of a 35mm Minox camera, which became the artist’s primary photo-making instrument until the time of his death in 1987. The resulting unique silver gelatin prints, which were produced during the final decade of Warhol’s life, illuminate most comprehensively the artist’s personal and artistic sphere. Warhol’s final and most obscure body of work, a series of “stitched photos,” was created by sewing together these silver gelatin prints in serial panels of four, six, or nine identical images.  Nearly five-hundred stitched photo works were created in all, most of which are now in the permanent collections of global institutions.

This exhibition brings together one of the largest selections of Warhol’s stitched photos, created within the culminating moment of Warhol’s photographic oeuvre and, indeed, his entire career.  In January 1987, Robert Miller Gallery opened the sole photography show ever presented during the artist’s life, as Warhol intended to make an incredible push for photography as a medium to be appreciated as a central part of his narrative and art-making processes. Six weeks later, Warhol died unexpectedly.

This exhibition closes 2/15/20.

 

Mar 292019
 

The Whitney Museum’s exhibition, Andy Warhol – From A to B and Back Again is a great representation of the artist’s body of work. Despite the fact that so much of it has been seen before, the curation makes so much of it feel fresh.

Andy Warhol’s artistic legacy is vast. He created a prolific amount of work throughout his career and the exhibition covers a lot of it. From his early commercial illustrations to his more abstract pieces, his collaborations with Basquiat, his silk screen portraits, his videos, films, and books, there is a lot to see. Below are a few highlights.

Warhol’s fascination with death is seen in numerous works in the exhibition. In 129 Die In Jet, 1962 (pictured above), he recreated the newspaper cover by hand and even used a sponge-blotting technique to reproduce the look of the halftone image. It’s interesting to see how this work foreshadowed his move to the screen printing process. This technique combined with his interest in the subject of death can be seen in his car crash paintings made the following year.

There’s a room dedicated to reproducing Warhol’s Cow Wallpaper, which he used to fill a room in the Castelli Gallery as part of a 1966 installation where he “retired from painting”. He used it again in 1971 for a retrospective at the Whitney, where he directed that all the works be hung on it for the exhibition. It’s a creative way to tie in that history and to present the various colored flower paintings.

Some of Warhol’s portrait series, Ladies and Gentlemen, 1975, which focused on members of New York’s queer community, is included in the show. It’s a nice contrast to his portraits that more commonly feature socialites and Hollywood celebrities.

His giant portrait of Mao is impressive, and takes up a wall in one of the galleries. It’s a reproduction of a painting by Zhang Zhenshi, which was at the time thought to be the most widely reproduced artwork in the world. Warhol created the work in response to reading about then President Nixon’s trip to meet with the Chinese leader, while China was still considered an enemy of the United States.

On a separate floor are several monitors playing Warhol’s video work and work related to the artist. Included is one of him eating a Burger King burger, shot by Danish documentarian Jørgen Leth, that the fast food chain used as part of their ad in this year’s Superbowl.

Warhol was a constantly evolving artist who worked in many mediums, in effective ways. The exhibition is a testament to Warhol’s unique perspective and how his work continues to resonate in a time period where so much of what he was commenting on has even more relevance.

Andy Warhol – From A to B and Back Again, closes 3/31/19 and is free Friday from 7-10pm.

Mar 082019
 

Empress Of- When I’m With Him

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (3/7-3/10-19)-

Thursday

Damien Jurado is playing at Highland Park Ebell with Anna St.Louis opening

Justus Proffit is having a record release party at Zebulon with Pardoner and Orchin also performing

MOCA Grand Avenue is having the last iteration of its Blame the Audience free film series organized by Jason Simon. Tonight features the films Tiger Morse by Andy Warhol, If Andy Warhol’s Super-8 Camera Could Talk by Roddy Bogawa, and Outfitumentary by K8 Hardy.

There’s an art walk and block party with live music, live artists, vendors, art, and more in Mar Vista

Brooklyn based multimedia artist Miss Eaves will be performing her songs at The Hi Hat (free)

Adia Victoria is playing at the Moroccan Lounge with Dick Stusso and Sofia Bolt opening

 

Friday

ArtNight Pasadena returns with its free evening of live music, performances, and free admission to museums and galleries in Pasadena. There will also be free shuttles to take you around to the various locations.

Artist Carrie Mae Weems is combining music, text, projection and video for her performance based work Past Tense at The Theatre at the Ace Hotel. The work looks at the famous work Antigone and its relevance to today’s political times.

French for Rabbits and Kate Teague are playing a free early show at Gold-Diggers

Big Wild are playing at The Novo with Robotaki and Mild Minds opening

Rosie Tucker will be performing at The Hi Hat to celebrate the release of her new LP

Small Forward and Jerkagram are opening for Reptaliens at The Satellite

Black Midi are playing at the Bootleg Theater with SK Kakraba and Superet opening

 

Saturday

Empress Of is playing at the El Rey Theatre with Salt Cathedral and Saro opening

At Bergamot Station there will be several artist talks starting at 10:30am with Stan Edmonson, Lou Beach and Pierre Picot speaking at Craig Krull; Laurie Raskin at Skidmore Contemporary Art at 11:30am; and Gabriel Sanchez and Carlo Macucci at Lora Schlesinger Gallery at 12:30pm

Helms Bakery District has free screenings all day of over 24 short films on architecture and design. They will be shown on a loop in the six participating showrooms.

Atlas Obscura and Adam Papagan are hosting a screening of Public Access Talent Show, which focuses on performances unique to LA, at Zebulon

Beatriz Cortez and Rafa Esparza will be at Craft Contemporary to speak about their collaborative relationship as artists and friends and their work (free but rsvp)

Hauser & Wirth will have a free daylong screening of Piero Manzoni Artista in conjunction with his exhibition at the gallery- Piero Manzoni. Materials of His Time

Sad Park are playing at The Smell with The Groans, Gold Vine and .XOM

Julia Holter is playing Lodge Room with Tess Roby opening

Sammy Brue, Alaska Reid and Will Fox are playing a free show at Bootleg Theater

 

Sunday

Zebulon has a free screening of Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove- Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love The Bomb and later they are hosting Weirdo Night with Dynasty Handbag, Patty Schemel and other performers along with a screening of the 1983 film City of Lost Souls, a queer punk musical starring Jayne County

It’s the last day to see Ralph Ziman’s Casspir Project at The Rendon Gallery and the second day of live painting that Ziman will be doing at the gallery with fellow artist Keya Tama

Smokescreens and The Molochs are opening for The Monochrome Set at the Echoplex

DJ Windows 98 (Win Butler of Arcade Fire) will be performing at 1720

Lowland Hum are playing at the Bootleg Theater

Jonathan Bree is playing at The Echo with Big Search and Das Kope opening

Mar 012019
 

Matvey Levenstein, LY, 2018

Currently at Kasmin Gallery are Matvey Levenstein’s paintings depicting scenes from his life in North Fork, Long Island. There’s a quiet, peaceful quality to the works, which begin with snapshots before they are turned into paintings. This exhibition closes Saturday 3/2/19.

Across the street at another of Kasmin Gallery’s Chelsea locations, and worth a visit, is an exhibition of some of Andy Warhol’s polaroid portraits.

Matvey Levenstein, Pink Moon, 2018

Susan Inglett Gallery is showing Slim… you don’t got the juice, an exhibition of work by Wilmer Wilson IV. His work with staples may seem familiar from its inclusion in the New Museum’s 2018 Triennial: Songs for Sabotage.

From the press release-

Slim… you don’t got the juice presents multidisciplinary departures from familiar modes of figurative representation, as they have evolved in the realm of photographic discourse. Wilmer Wilson IV has developed strategies of redaction and annotation in his work that begin to destabilize the norms of making and viewing portraiture through visual, material, and technical manipulation. An exploration into the complex renderings of individual subject-hood versus object-hood in portraiture, the artist has conceived of a stapled-surface-as-viewing-device that mediates image with material. The device is manifest in a series of staple works that almost fully shroud the photographic subjects beneath dense fields of metal fasteners. The austere, randomized application of the staples onto the surface of each portrait results in a resistance of visual penetration from many angles, complicating access to the underlying figures and deconstructing the voyeuristic inclinations of the viewer.

This exhibition closes 3/16/19.

Wilmer Wilson IV, Host, 2018

 

At Lehmann Maupin’s 24th Street location is McArthur Binion, Hand:Work, an exhibition of the artist’s grid paintings created with oil paint stick and paper on board. The patterns created in the work are overwhelming at first glance but then when seen up close, the personal details add a new dimension to the paintings.

From the press release

…For Binion, his personal documents represent the sum total of one’s social life: relationships, citizenship, vocation, and family life. The revealing and obscuring of these aspects of his life also addresses the larger sociopolitical reality of African-American identity—often obscured or erased from common knowledge, yet always present in tandem with major movements in American culture. In his newest Hand:Work paintings, Binion takes an introspective approach that is more closely aligned with the artist’s own self-perception—effectively, his first self-portraits. Using copies of a photo of the home where he was born, along with a photograph of his hand as the ground layer of the paintings, Binion pares down his identity to its most essential elements. These images are tiled in repeated succession, layered under his repetitious line work in oil stick. These gestures themselves relate to memories Binion has of his early childhood farm life, a disciplined approach to the cyclical, sustained effort he maintains in his work today. Through the insertion of his hand, literally in the photographs, and figuratively in his intricate, overlapping mark-making, the artist relates to his earliest introduction to artistry in his mother’s quilting, a tradition he modified and carried into his practice.

This exhibition closes 3/2/19.

McArthur Binion at Lehmann Maupin

McArthur Binion at Lehmann Maupin, detail of above painting

Robert Mann Gallery is showing the newly discovered work of photographer Ed Sievers. The exhibition of black and white photos also includes his later work from the 1970s in Venice Beach. The gallery also has an exhibition of Michael Kenna’s series of black and white female nudes made in Japan (not shown). Both shows close 3/2/19.

Ed Sievers, Untitled (woman in the shadows), c. 1960s, courtesy of the artist, image via Robert Mann Gallery

Damn! The Defiant, a group show curated by Damon Brandt and Andrew Freiser at Fredericks & Freiser Gallery, brings together “images of rebellion and dissent in contemporary portraiture” and includes a wide variety of work in different mediums from an incredible selection of artists that includes Mary Ellen Mark, Gordon Parks, Dana Schutz, Bruce Davidson, Whitfield Lovell and many more. It’s a show that’s very appropriate for a time period that is going to require more and more defiance.

From the press release-

Nothing creates projected personal territory more than the emotional push back generated from the recalcitrant expression of a defiant subject. Yet ironically, it is the very nature of this engagement that makes it difficult for the viewer to quickly detach or withdraw from what in fact amounts to an extended glare or moment of social tension. In a time of undeniable anxiety, finding both the common and contrasting ground in the portrayal of defiance speaks directly to the angst and pre-occupation for self-determination that has been and continues to be a pervasive human concern.

This exhibition closes 3/2/19.

 

Installation view of Damn! The Defiant, image via Fredericks & Freiser

 

May 282018
 

Currently at Palm Springs Museum of Art is Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation. Taking up the majority of the first floor of the museum, the exhibition includes many of his well known prints as well as several of his illustrations from his early graphic design career, a few of his Screen Tests (including Edie Sedgwick’s), his album covers, and a short documentary created for the museum with local residents who knew the artist.

This exhibition closes 5/28/18.

Jul 272017
 

Portugal. The Man- Feel It Still

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (7/27-7/30/17)-

Thursday

MOCA Grand Avenue has a free screening of Eve Fowler’s film- with it which it as it if it is to be

LACMA has a free screening of Step, a documentary about a high school girls step dance team in Baltimore, and includes a conversation with the director Amanda Lipitz and the subjects of the film

For the last of Hammer Museum’s RebelRebel free music programs, Amber Mark and Maria Del Pilar are performing

Thee Commons are playing a free concert at the Levitt Pavilion in MacArthur Park

This week’s free concert at the Santa Monica Pier is Miami Horror with Cleopold opening

Friday

Summer Nights in the Garden, the Natural History Museum’s free evening event, returns with music, a tomato talk and tasting, botanical tours, knot tying, a live animal meet and greet and nature inspired activities

For Pershing Square’s free outdoor movie night this week they are showing World War Z

The Wiltern has the Lucent Dossier Experience which combines music, dancing, aerial acts, and more

Steve Gunn is playing at The Echo with Heron Oblivion and Mary Lattimore opening (or check him out tomorrow for free at the Getty)

Grand Performances this week has the U.S. premiere of the multi-media performance La Linea, a story about everyday life on the Mexico-U.S. Border, with live music, visual projections, and Norteño choreography

The World Record, The Henry Clay People, The Parson Red Heads and Le Switch are playing at The Satellite

Saturday

Curator, critic and art historian Hans Ulrich Obrist will be discussing the work of Marisa Merz with Hammer chief curator Connie Butler at the Hammer Museum (free)

The Big Moon are opening for Marika Hackman at the Bootleg Theater

Steve Gunn is performing for the Getty Museum’s free concert series Saturdays off the 405

A Tribe Called Red are playing at the El Rey Theatre

Baio is playing a free concert at the Levitt Pavilion in MacArthur Park with starRo opening

For the second Summer Happenings at The Broad-Strange Forest takes its name from the work of Takashi Murakami and will concentrate on artists who work with traditional Japanese and Western influences. These include musician Tokiko Ihara, who plays the Sho, a meditative traditional woodwind instrument, female drum and guitar duo Afrirampo, and solo artist Oorutaichi, who combines electronic music, folk and pop with his own invented language. Those Japan-based groups are joined by ex-DNA member Ikue Mori and Miho Hatori of Cibo Matto; Devendra Banhart, whose last album Ape in Pink Marble was deeply inspired by Japanese culture; and former Ponytail member Dustin Wong in collaboration with Takako Minekawa. ($25 advance/$30 at the door- includes access to the museum)

Waxahatchee are playing at The Regent Theater with Cayetana and Snail Mail opening

Sunday

Portugal. The Man are playing at the Hollywood Palladium with Hanni El Khatib and Fatlip

LACMA has a free screening (at 1 pm) of the HBO documentary BRILLO BOX (3¢ OFF), the story of director Lisanne Skyler’s parents purchase of one of Andy Warhol’s Brillo Boxes in 1969 for $1,000 and its increase in value in the art market (long after they had traded it) to over 3 million dollars. There will be a discussion with Skyler and curator Stephanie Barron to follow.  The doc will debut on HBO on August 7.

For the last day of Fowler Museum’s African-Print Fashion Now! exhibition, there are a series of events including an exhibition tour, art talk, hands on art making, African fashion Pop-Up Shops, and a live concert (free)

There’s a Johnny Ramone tribute at Hollywood Forever cemetery that includes a screening of one of Johnny’s favorite films, Buffalo ’66, and an introduction by director Vincent Gallo. In addition, Billy Idol and Steve Jones will perform acoustic songs, there will be an exhibit of Ramones memorabilia, a pop up gallery, a Chris Cornell tribute, and more. ($20 in advance /$25 day of)

Tobin Sprout (of Guided by Voices) is performing songs from his new solo album at the Bootleg Theater with Elf Power opening