Oct 302020
 

Diego Rivera’s Mandragora, 1939 seen at the San Diego Museum of Art.

From the museum’s wall description-

Diego Rivera created many portraits during his long career. Some portrayed unnamed individuals who agreed to pose for the artist, while others depicted close friends and well-known figures in the arts. The sitter of this work has been identified as Maya Guarina. The delicate lace headpiece and dress worn by Guarina contrast with the skull she she holds in her hands and the spiderweb in the upper left-hand corner. In the upper right-hand corner emerges a small mandrake, a plant identified as a hallucinogen and associated with magic. While these objects might reveal something about Guarina, they also contribute to an enigmatic portrait with Surrealist qualities,

Apr 142020
 

Wayne Thiebaud’s Make Up Girl (1982), seen at the San Diego Museum of Art. The museum is currently closed due to COVID-19 but they have a lot of excellent online programming including virtual performances, lectures, virtual tours and more.

Dec 062019
 

Murals of La Jolla is a project started in 2010 by The Athenaeum and the La Jolla Community Foundation. It commissions artists to create work to be displayed on buildings around La Jolla. The works are on view for a minimum of two years (a map of current work here)

The above work is Favorite Color (2010) by Roy McMakin.

From the Murals of La Jolla website regarding this work-

…“The idea was very simple. I have always, since a child, been intrigued at both my own emotions around color preference, and also others. It has been important, and part of my identity to know what my favorite color is. I often recall times that I discussed color with my friends as a child and the talk always centered around preference. And I have found as an adult that most people still enjoy sharing what their favorite color is.”

“My proposal for the wall in La Jolla was to create a visual document of what a somewhat arbitrary group of people, of various ages, etc., choose as their favorite color. I began the process by asking people their favorite color, and then I presented them with a selection of 4 to 6 colors, of which they choose the one that was closest to the color they liked best. For example, if someone said “blue”, then I showed them blue swatches and they chose one. One square was painted that color. I like the idea that this takes place at a certain time, and that the ultimate form of the mural was dictated by the number of folks that showed up.”

This mural is located at 7596 Eads Avenue.

 

Dec 052019
 

Murals of La Jolla is a project started in 2010 by The Athenaeum and the La Jolla Community Foundation. It commissions artists to create work to be displayed on buildings around La Jolla. The works are on view for a minimum of two years (a map of current work here)

The above work, Expecting to Fly (for the Zeros), 2013, is by Fred Tomaselli and honors Chula Vista based Chicano punk band, The Zeros.

From the Murals of La Jolla website about the work-

It combines cutout images of insects, animals, plants, butterflies, birds, and body parts to create a visionary image of a man falling through space. The title of this work, Expecting to Fly, is the title of a song written by Neil Young and performed by Buffalo Springfield in the late ’60’s.  The man falling through space can be read as a crowd surfer, an image that comes out of the Punk Rock movement. One traditional idea of the “sublime” deals with losing oneself to the vastness of the universe. In this case, the crowd-surfer is losing himself to the vast, collectivist  “organism” of the crowd.  “In this piece I try to find commonalities in the pursuit of a modern sublime that stretch through time and past ideologies”.

This mural is located at 7569 Girard Avenue.

Nov 202019
 

Murals of La Jolla is a project started in 2010 by The Athenaeum and the La Jolla Community Foundation. It commissions artists to create work to be displayed on buildings around La Jolla. The works are on view for a minimum of two years (a map of current work here)

The above work, Tear Stains Be Gone, was created by Jean Lowe in 2015 and is still on view as of this writing in 2019 at 7661 Girard Avenue.