Nov 012019
 

Closing 11/2 at Tanya Bonakdar’s Los Angeles location is Ernesto Neto’s interactive exhibition Children of the Earth.

From the press release-

In Children of the Earth, Neto creates an alluring environment of color, materials, fragrances and sound, transforming the gallery into a living organism, where visitors are encouraged to wander, touch, feel, interact and connect.

Upon entering the gallery, a curtain in green and brown patterns invites the viewer to walk through a tunnel-like path which leads to the main gallery space. Entitled Children of the Earth, a large-scale installation of crochet, spices and leaves hangs from the ceiling to the floor. The large biomorphic shape—hand knitted in vibrant colors of yellows, greens, purples and reds—is flanged by drop-shaped crochet vines that serve as counterbalance and establish the delicate equilibrium of the piece. Here, references to nature interconnect with formal questions of tension, gravity and weight. On the floor, tracing the outline of the structure above, a soft surface of handmade textile is installed. Ceramic vases sprout from the ground, representing the diversity of peoples inhabiting the planet, and that ultimately, we are all the children of the earth. Musical instruments, spices, and crystals comprise an integral part of this malleable, highly tactile sculpture, which engages the five senses, and invites viewers to connect with one another in new and meaningful ways. In expanding the boundaries of physical space and calling for a new type of interaction, Neto creates an experience that is physical, sensorial, intellectual and social all at once.

Surrounding the piece, as another layer of skin, hand-sewn fabric hangs. The organic pattern and color pallet further recall the natural world, as they invoke the forest, wood grain, or the circulatory system of a plant. The path the visitor follows throughout the space, and from within the piece—like an organic line in nature—is analogues to Neto’s conception of life where there is “no separation between humans and nature, nor between art making and art experience”, highlighting that in the exhibition, as in life, everything is connected.

In the back gallery a hanging platform with a crochet canopy and crochet tendrils is installed. Designed for direct interaction, this is a healing bed that offers a moment of rest and respite, where people can connect to themselves, as to one another.  The tendrils function as ‘connectors’, as they amplify the pulse of life while connecting us to the environment and to our own physicality. Embracing the participant in its serenity, the healing bed investigates the meeting point of art, sensation, personal connection and the human body.

The exhibition as a whole connects mind, body and nature through a sensory experience that is unmediated. It is an invitation to connect to ourselves and to our planet at a time when connectivity is most needed. For Neto, sculpture is an extension of the body, and the body is ultimately an extension of earth.

Jul 252019
 

Lala Lala- Water Over Sex

Thing to do in Los Angeles this weekend (7/25-7/28/19)-

Thursday

Megan Thee Stallion, Rico Nasty, Blueface, Comethazine, Tierra Whack, DaBaby and more will be performing for the XXL Freshman 2019 Concert at The Novo

Justus Proffit and Outer Spaces are opening for Radiator Hospital at The Hi Hat

Hammer Museum’s free Summer Concert Series continues this week with a performance by The Tracks as well as KCRW DJs, food trucks and a cash bar

Skirball Cultural Center is free on Thursdays and this week there is a free sunset concert with marimba super-group Río Mira performing

Hollywood Night Market at Yamashiro is a lovely way to have some food and drinks while enjoying beautiful views of the city- free shuttles leave from the Mosaic parking lot

 

Friday

The Underground Museum’s Purple Garden Cinema is hosting FWD: Short Films. The free program, curated by MEMORY, will feature a range of work from emerging and established filmmakers.

Metro Art has a new program featuring LA based DJ collectives- Movements at Union Station. The first night in the series will feature The Soul Children, an LA based crew of artist, promoters and DJs. The event will also include a drop-in silkscreen stencil workshop led by Self Help Graphics & Art, a photo booth and food trucks.

B Boys are playing a free show at Hotel Figueroa with Bodega and Shark Toys

Golden Vessel is performing at El Cid with Instupendo and The Nicholas

The Music Center’s Dance DTLA, a night of free dance lessons and music ,continues this week with a disco theme

UCLA Film & Television Archive is screening an action film double feature of Sister Street Fighter and Lady Terminator, at Hammer Museum’s Billy Wilder Theater ($9)

Florist are playing at Pico Union Project with Hand Habits (solo)

 

Saturday

The Getty’s free concert series Off the 405 continues this week with Lala Lala

Bergamot Station is having a Summer Open House all day with live music, art openings, a book sale, art talk, food, drink, and more

The Box is screening Leigh Ledare’s The Task at 2pm with a conversation with the artist and Catherine Taft, director and curator at LAXART, to follow from 4:30-6:30pm

Morgan Delt is playing at the Lodge Room with Pearl Charles, Vinyl Williams, The Sunsettes, and Mad Alchemy Light Show

The Drums are playing at the Hollywood Palladium with CHAI

Smokescreens, Holy Tunics, and Susan are playing at The Monty Bar

UCLA Film & Television Archive is screening a double feature of the Paris-set films Funny Face and Paris Blues, at Hammer Museum’s Billy Wilder Theater ($9)

Latin American folk-rock group Aterciopelados are playing a free show at Pershing Square with Elefante opening

 

Sunday

To celebrate the opening weekend of The Invisible Man and the Masque of Blackness, Zak Ové’s sculptural installation, LACMA is hosting an afternoon of art, music, which will include a discussion with Ové. A performance by Trinidad Steel Drum Band begins at 4 pm, followed by a conversation with Ové at 5 pm. (free)

Independent Shakespeare Co. is having a free performance of the play Pericles in Griffith Park tonight (also Saturday)

Shutups, Weird Night, Launcher, Slaughterhouse, and Shitgiver are all performing at The Rec Center

Cam’ron is playing a $5 show at The Novo

Johanna Samuels and Dylan Rodrigue are opening for Lou Roy at the Bootleg Theater

 

All Weekend

OUTFEST Los Angeles LGBTQ Film Festival continues in various locations with screenings that include shorts and television episodes. This weekend some of the screenings will be at the outdoor Ford Theatre including- the Kathy Griffin documentary, with Griffin in conversation with Louis Virtel pre-screening on Thursday, and the documentary Gay Chorus Deep South on Friday which includes a performance by the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus.

May 242019
 

Wendy White’s exhibition Racetrack Playa, at Shulamit Nazarian, is a very American show. Her collages of old car ads ,and their often blatant sexism, combined with the use of denim as a sculptural medium, play with the iconography of America’s past to force us to think about America today. How do you reconcile a love of the open road and exploring natural landscapes with the environmental destruction caused by using cars fueled with oil to get there? How much of the past perception of women as objects still informs thinking today? Will America get out of its wood paneled basement to move into a better place- or will its longing for the past continue to slow its progress?

From the press release-

Shulamit Nazarian is pleased to announce representation of New York-based artist Wendy White. The artist’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Racetrack Playa, will feature new paintings, sculptures, pigment prints, and a site-specific installation.

The exhibition takes its name from a three-mile dry lakebed in Death Valley National Park where sliding rocks or “sailing stones” have inscribed mysterious linear imprints on the landscape. Using this scarred landscape as a metaphor for our current times, the works in Racetrack Playa explore power, entitlement, and imperialism via the aesthetics and evolution of American car culture.

In pieces that function as both homage and critique, White collapses signs of racing and car culture with references to 20th-century American painting. Multiple-canvas works such as Posi Track and Burnout (both 2019) take cues from James Rosenquist’s famous Vietnam War-era painting F-111 (1964–65). In White’s versions, images of mangled engines, worn tire treads, and damaged landscapes suggest a trampling of both philosophical ideals and the natural environment. In addition, the works make reference to Andy Warhol’s Death and Disasters series and Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings.

The exhibition also includes new works from the artist’s ongoing Jeans series. These pieces make use of worn denim, a quintessentially American fabric associated with labor and a sense of rugged individualism. Co-opting the material and its cultural connotations as a substrate for painting, White makes marks with dripped and splattered bleach before garnishing each piece with flat cut-out rainbows, beer bottles, and energy drinks.

A site-specific installation complete with wood paneled walls, carpet, and one of White’s signature denim sofas creates a quasi-automotive shop backdrop for a new suite of unique pigment prints. Carving directly into the paneling, White references the DIY aesthetic of the 70s muscle car era by way of hand-drawn symbols, slogans and logos.

Taken together, the works in Racetrack Playa riff on the visual cues of car culture, the resilient materiality of denim, and the sexiness of commercial graphics to examine a society long drawn to speed and dominance. Reexamining this typically male-dominated arena, White pushes back on advertising’s false promise that perhaps all of your desires are for the taking, if you just smoke the right cigarettes and drive the right car.

This exhibition closes 5/25/19.

Feb 252019
 

 

Currently outside of LACMA’s Ahmanson Building is one of artist Sam Durant’s “electric signs”. It takes its text from a photo taken at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have A Dream” speech.