Nov 012020
 

Artist Scherezade García’s large-scale community altar at Green-Wood Cemetery’s Historic Chapel for Día de los Muertos. Visitors were encouraged to bring personal offerings to a community altar, including flowers, photographs, and notes, among other objects.

Info from the artist’s Instagram

Inspired by altars found throughout Mexico and the Mexican diaspora, Garcia’s altar combines her own unique style with this centuries-old celebration of the departed.

The centerpiece of the altar is a weeping, cinnamon-colored Statue of Liberty. By mixing all the colors in her palette, Garcia achieves a brown hue that embodies the ideals of diversity and inclusiveness. Her rendition of the Statue of Liberty, an iconic symbol of New York City, evokes the multitudes of immigrants that have found home here, including large Latin and Caribbean American communities. Garcia has dedicated the altar to all the New Yorkers who fell victim to the coronavirus.

Nov 012020
 

The sad news is that because of the pandemic Hollywood Forever Cemetery’s grounds are closed for its annual Día de Los Muertos Festival.

The good news is that they are having a Día de los Muertos event online today at noon! It’s hosted by Fernanda Kelly and includes performances by David Hidalgo and Louie Pérez of Los Lobos, Buyepongo, and Tropa Magica.

Oct 302020
 

Diego Rivera’s Mandragora, 1939 seen at the San Diego Museum of Art.

From the museum’s wall description-

Diego Rivera created many portraits during his long career. Some portrayed unnamed individuals who agreed to pose for the artist, while others depicted close friends and well-known figures in the arts. The sitter of this work has been identified as Maya Guarina. The delicate lace headpiece and dress worn by Guarina contrast with the skull she she holds in her hands and the spiderweb in the upper left-hand corner. In the upper right-hand corner emerges a small mandrake, a plant identified as a hallucinogen and associated with magic. While these objects might reveal something about Guarina, they also contribute to an enigmatic portrait with Surrealist qualities,

Dec 312018
 

If you are in Palm Springs for New Year’s Eve, take some time and visit Robolights. This is the last year it will be at its current location on an estate in the Movie Colony area.

Robolights is an ongoing work created by artist Kenny Irwin Jr., at his childhood home. The sprawling installation incorporates Christmas holiday themes, robots, aliens and, of course, numerous lights. The various creations are made from found, recycled, and donated objects.

There are some Disneyland influences, seen in a castle similar to the It’s A Small World Castle, and a boat with creatures singing holiday songs (you see it while crossing a bridge over the water), reminiscent of the Pirates of the Caribbean ride. There are also merry-go-rounds, animatronics, video games, and music which give the place the feeling of an amusement park.

Also worth mentioning are the Islamic details seen around the installation, adding to the uniqueness of the space. The artist converted to Islam as an adult.

Robolights is a maze of larger than life creatures as well as little details that become more and more noticeable on each pass through. It’s eccentric, fun, chaotic, a little bit dark at times (so many skulls and skeletons) and well worth spending some time exploring.

Keep in mind if you go that there is no neighborhood parking around Robolights- only for residents. Parking is located a short walk away at Ruth Hardy Park.  Robolights will close on January 2nd, 2019.

 

 

 

Oct 282017
 

Today in Los Angeles celebrate Día de Los Muertos at the huge Hollywood Forever celebration which will have ceremonial altars, theatrical performances, Aztec Ritual Dancers, face painting, food trucks, a marketplace,  music that includes Aterciopelados, Cuco, Ximena Sariñana, Very Be Careful, La Chamba, and more.  Get there early, it gets very crowded.

You can also celebrate the holiday in Grand Park- the altars will remain set up until 11/5, but tonight is Noche de Ofrenda, which will feature traditional dance and prayer led by the local indigenous community, as well as Los Angeles-based poets and musicians.