May 172024
 

“Island”, 2024. Acrylic on paper

“Daredevil”, 2024, Acrylic and colored pencil on paper, and “L’Observatoire, 2024, Acrylic on paper

Yancey Richardson is currently showing two exhibitions which focus on architecture and city life. Mary Lum’s paintings and collages for temporary arrangements combine elements of city life found on her walks in New York and Paris. Fragments she discovers along the way combine to form dynamic interpretations of these environments.

From the press release-

Lum mines aspects of daily life, vistas of architecture, design, and advertising that could easily go unnoticed. These familiar and often mundane sights are transformed into something more: juxtapositions and layers of random elements, which show both spontaneity and control, perhaps revealing a glimpse into the soul of a city.

The exhibition title temporary arrangements refers to Lum’s journeys though the streets of New York and Paris, observing the fragments of a crumbling façade of a building, a vendor’s pushcart, or a poster for a vernissage, which may have a short shelf life in the urban environment. Lum takes photographs on the streets looking at geometric forms, planes of color, and text. She pulls off bits of advertising posters that are peeling from their bases and collects printed materials – all of which are collaged in her sketchbooks, becoming the basis for her paintings. These elements provide inspiration for Lum, who creates a collision of perspectives and forms that boldly announce the delights of quiet discoveries.

Susan Cross, Senior Curator, Mass MoCA, wrote that Lum’s work “suggests the speed of daily life and the fragmented way in which we encounter language in the world. Language speeds up and slows down, much in the way that when we are walking or riding a bike in the city our pace is determined by what we notice around us. Words come together and fall apart, with each individual viewer making meaning.”

Influenced by Cubism and Russian Constructivism, Lum is also interested in the concept of psychogeography, as practiced by members of the Situationist International movement in the 1950s and ‘60s. Referring to the effect of a geographical location on the emotions and behavior of the individual, one may see Lum’s interdisciplinary practice as a physical manifestation of this phenomenon. Lum also finds inspiration in artist and activist Corita Kent’s graphic style and fractured text as well as artist Ray Yoshida’s use of comics, which tell stories with isolated fragments.

Mary Lum wrote, “A couple of years ago I saw a William Kentridge exhibition at the Royal Academy in London. One of the things that kept jumping out at me from that show was the phrase: ’FIND THE LESS GOOD IDEA.’ That painted phrase was repeated several times in various parts of the exhibition, and each time I saw it I got a little jolt of recognition. I’m not sure exactly what Kentridge meant by that phrase (it’s related to his Centre for the Less Good Idea in Johannesburg), but to me it meant everything about the way I work. I took the reference to mean finding the things that are in the margins, those things that are on the periphery, those things that are between the lines, that you see out of the corner of your eye. Not through a concerted effort, but by paying attention, looking around, looking the other way. And often, later, you are not sure that you’ve seen these things at all.”

For Lynn Saville’s exhibition Elevated, she has captured NYC at its most peaceful time, twilight.

From the press release-

Twilight in the city, after the sun disappears below the horizon and the hustle and bustle has dissipated, is where Lynn Saville finds refuge and inspiration. For decades, she has documented these fleeting, dream-like moments suspended in time within the urban landscape.

Elevated showcases Saville’s mastery of the city’s natural light. Much like Edward Hopper, who painted the solitude of New York City through its buildings and rooftops, Saville’s photographs transform architectural elements and structures into dramatic geometric forms and patterns through light and shadows. Saville describes the importance of capturing images at twilight, “During this transitional time, the change from daylight to moonlight and artificial light seems to awaken the city’s own dreams, apart from the business and errands of its inhabitants. For me, these dreams are expressed in basic shapes and patterns, as if the infrastructure were communing with its own geometry while distracting details are hidden in shadow. The shifting light brings out forms that may disappear in the darkness of night or remain invisible during the more chaotic visual world of daylight.”

As the exhibition title implies, photographs featured in the show were taken from the elevated platforms of New York City’s mass transit system or from the street looking upward at structures on rooftops. These photographs explore perspectives on the language of the built environment and our perception of the cityscape. For example, Elevated subway platforms offer an expanse of skyline structures such as rooftops, water towers, and upper sections of nearby buildings, which along with the coming and goings of trains become the focal point.

Both of these exhibitions close 5/18/24.

Jun 222023
 

“When I Was Young”, 1995

“Here I Am/Estoy Aquí”, 2022

Two works from Joey Terrill: Cut and Paste, a solo exhibition at Ortuzar Projects in NYC this past February.

From the gallery’s press release-

Raised in Highland Park and East Los Angeles, Terrill was part of a small group of Chicano artists who in the 1970s and 80s created works that diverged from traditional Chicano-based imagery and subject matter to include visual representations reflecting his queer lived experiences. Utilizing the existing image culture that surrounded him, Terrill combines personal photographs, found pop cultural imagery, and reproductions of artworks by queer predecessors, including Diane Arbus, Robert Mapplethorpe and Wilhelm von Gloeden, to conjure utopic spaces. Spanning from his earliest explorations to substantial new works, Cut and Paste reveals collage as a foundational element to Terrill’s expanded artistic practice.

Beginning with abstract collages and silkscreens made while Terrill was an undergraduate at Immaculate Heart College—an art department still heavily influenced by the graphic artist and activist Sister Corita Kent—the exhibition draws out the interconnectivity of illustration, collage, and printmaking in Terrill’s work and their influence upon the characteristically flat style of his early paintings. Like many artists who came of age in the wake of Pop, he found refuge within the fantasies of American image culture–his earliest artworks covering his bedroom walls, which he transformed with a mix of drawings, photographs, and clippings of comic books, film starlets, and music icons. His silkscreens from the mid-1970s–a medium central to the larger Chicano art movement–find him applying a graphic sensibility to not only representations of brown bodies, but queer desire, an impulse he would continue to explore in his episodic Homeboy Beautiful proto-zines from the end of the decade.

Terrill was selected to be one of the artists in Hammer Museum’s 2023 biennial, Made in L.A., which will open this October. He also has a work in the current exhibition at the museum- Together in Time: Selections from the Hammer Contemporary Collection running until 8/20/23.

Mar 022023
 

Artist Miguel Luciano– Vinyl banner from the public art project “Mapping Resistance: The Young Lords in El Barrio”, 2019 Image: Young Lords Member with Pallante Newspaper (1970)” by Hiram Maristany and “The People’s Pulpit” (2022), a repurposed vintage pulpit from the First Spanish Methodist Church in East Harlem.

Miguel Luciano- Vinyl banner from the public art project “Mapping Resistance: The Young Lords in El Barrio”, 2019 Image: Young Lords Member with Pallante Newspaper (1970)” by Hiram Maristany

 

Poor People’s Art: A (Short) Visual History of Poverty in the United States at USF Contemporary Art Museum in Tampa uses installations and artworks to tell the story of, and expand perspectives on, The Poor People’s Campaign- from its origins in the late 1960s to the present day form, as well as comment on poverty and other social issues. Both educational and engaging, it shows that despite long struggles and some progress, we are still very far from much needed social change, especially in regards to poverty.

The museum also produced a free full color, 48 page workbook that you can pick up there or download as a PDF that can be downloaded from their website.

From the gallery’s website-

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is well known for his “I Have a Dream” speech, yet much less emphasis is placed on his campaign to seek justice for America’s poor, “The Poor People’s Campaign.” This was a multi-cultural, multi-faith, multi-racial movement aimed at uniting poor people and their allies to demand an end to poverty and inequality. Fifty-three years after Dr. King’s death, the Reverend William Barber II launched a contemporary push to fulfill MLK’s ambitious brief — one that calls for a “revolution of values” that unites poor and impacted communities across the country. The exhibition Poor People’s Art: A (Short) Visual History of Poverty in the United States represents a visual response to Dr. King’s “last great dream” as well as Reverend Barber’s recent “National Call for Moral Revival.”

With artworks spanning more than 50 years, the exhibition is divided into two parts: Resurrection (1968-1994) and Revival (1995-2022). Resurrection includes photographs, paintings, prints, videos, sculptures, books, and ephemera made by a radically inclusive company of American artists, from Jill Freedman’s photographs of Resurrection City, the tent enclave that King’s followers erected on the National Mall in 1968, to John Ahearns’ plaster cast sculpture Luis Fuentes, South Bronx (1979). Revival offers contemporary engagement across a range of approaches, materials, and points of view. Conceived in a declared opposition to poverty, racism, militarism, environmental destruction, health inequities, and other interlocking injustices, this exhibition shows how artists in the US have visualized poverty and its myriad knock-on effects since 1968. Participating artists include John Ahearn, Nina Berman, Martha De la Cruz, Jill Freedman, Rico Gatson, Mark Thomas Gibson, Corita Kent, Jason Lazarus, Miguel Luciano, Hiram Maristany, Narsiso Martinez, Adrian Piper, Robert Rauschenberg, Rodrigo Valenzuela, William Villalongo & Shraddha Ramani, and Marie Watt.

Below are some images from the show and the descriptions from the museum.

About the two works above from the museum’s walls-

A multimedia visual artist whose work explores themes of history, popular culture, and social justice, Miguel Luciano revisits the history of the Young Lords, a revolutionary group of young Puerto Rican activists who organized for social justice in their communities beginning in the late 1960s. Luciano’s first contribution to Poor People’s Art is a vinyl banner from the public art project Mapping Resistance: The Young Lords in El Barrio (2019), a collaboration with artist Hiram Maristany. It features the photograph “Young Lords Member with Pa’lante Newspaper (1970)” by Maristany, who was the official photographer of the Young Lords and a founding member of the New York chapter. This banner, along with nine other enlarged Maristany photographs, were installed throughout East Harlem at the same locations where their history occurred 50 years prior.

Luciano’s second contribution to Poor People’s Art is the sculpture The People’s Pulpit (2022), a repurposed vintage pulpit from the First Spanish Methodist Church in East Harlem. The Young Lords famously took over the church in 1969 and renamed it “The People’s Church”; they hosted free breakfast programs, clothing drives, health screenings, and other community services there. In this exhibition, The People’s Pulpit features an historic recording of Nuyorican poet Pedro Pietri reciting the celebrated poem Puerto Rican Obituary during the Young Lord’s takeover of The People’s Church.

Placards created by USF Contemporary Art Museum students, faculty and staff

Martha De La Cruz, “Techo de Sin (Roof of Without)”, 2021, made from stolen, scavenged and donated materials found in Southwest Florida.

About the above work from the wall plaque-

Afro-Taino artist Martha De la Cruz fashioned her sculptural installation Techo de sin (Roof of Without), 2021, from stolen, scavenged and donated materials found in Southwest Florida. According to the artist, “Florida is home to a large population of Latin American migrants who have ended up in the US largely due to economic pressures, exploitation and veins of power etched by Europe and the US.” Her powerful work deals with the results of this disjunction and the “symptoms thereabouts (e.g. houselessness, fugitiv-ity, government corruption, and income disparity, etc.).” According to De la Cruz, the word “sin” is a common Dominican mispronunciation for the word “zinc.” The sculpture is animated by a single light bulb that turns on for just ten minutes a day.

Narsiso Martinez “Hollywood & Vine”, 2022

Jason Lazarus “Resurrection City /Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival / A Third Reconstruction”, 2023, plywood, utility fabric, blankets, sleeping cot, paint, lamp, plastic, research library, historical ephemera

From the wall plaque about the Lazarus installation-

Jason Lazarus’s sculptural installation Resurrection City/Poor People’s Campaign: A National call for Moral Revival/A Third Reconstruction (2023) is anchored in the artist’s historical research and several key photographs of Resurrection City. A tent-like shelter inspired by the temporary residences that populated the 1968 mass protest, the interactive sculpture contains simple sleeping quarters and a curated library filled with physical literature and ephemera centered on both the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign and the 2018 Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival, co-led by Rev. Dr.William Barber and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis. The library allows for audiences to trace, listen, and talk about the history of advocating for the poor, from 1865 to the present. Additionally, the artist provides a custom transcription (and a QR hyperlink) to Barber’s 49-minute address on the syndicated radio show “The Breakfast Club” in which he carefully outlines his powerful vision for how we might address poverty going forward.

Inside the Jason Lazarus installation

A book and magazine from Jason Lazarus’ installation floor

Mark Thomas Gibson, “Town Crier July 23rd”, 2021

Rico Gatson, “Audre #2”, 2021

Jill Freedman, “Poor People’s Campaign, Resurrection City” 1968

About Jill Freedman’s photograph-

In the spring of 1968, the talented young street photographer Jill Freedman quit her day job as a copywriter in New York City to join the Poor People’s March on Washington. Freedman lived in Resurrection City for the entire six weeks of the encampment’s existence, photographing its residents as they rallied, made speeches, protested in front of government buildings, confronted police, built makeshift kitchens, organized clothing swaps, and dealt with flooding, petty crime, and illness. One of the most important postwar documentarians, and one of the few women photographers of the era, Freedman captured it all. Freedman’s 2017 book, Resurrection City, 1968-from which this exhibition draws a dozen powerful images-showcases the photographs that she made as a participant in the original Poor People’s Campaign. In multiple ways, Freedman’s images are the sympathetic perch upon much of which much of the present exhibition loosely hangs.

This exhibition closes 3/4/23.

May 182018
 

Tricky feat. Martina Topley-Bird- When We Die

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (5/17-5/20/18)-

Thursday

MOCA Music, a free (with RSVP) night of musical performances at The Geffen Contemporary location, will feature THE MARIAS, Jarina De Marco, Sister Mantos, and a DJ set by Chulita Vinyl club

Ariel Pink is playing at The Wiltern with DIIV opening

The Broad and X-TRA are hosting a discussion of artist Joseph Beuys with NY writer Lynne Tillman and LA visual artist Kerry Tribe ($15)

Dead Horses are opening for Horse Feathers at the Bootleg Theater

Artists Taisha Paggett and Ashley Hunt will be discussing their individual work and ongoing collaboration at Art+Practice

Aïsha Devi is performing at the Echoplex with GILA and bod opening

Friday

Tricky is performing at The Fonda Theatre with Young Magic opening

LACMA is hosting a free screening of American Animals with a conversation with writer/director Bart Layton and actor Blake Jenner to follow

Vita and the Woolf are opening for The Lighthouse and the Whaler at Moroccan Lounge

Generacion Suicida are playing at The Hi Hat with The Wraith and Tenement Rats

Peter Hook & The Light are playing at The Wiltern

Saturday

Off the 405, The Getty’s free music night, is back with Allah-Las

Annenberg Space for Photography is having an after hours night (6-9pm), a chance to check out the exhibit Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library, as well as enjoy some food and music (free but register)

Artist Matthew Day Jackson will be in conversation with LAXART Executive Director Hamza Walker at Hauser & Wirth

Arcana Books is hosting a book signing and a discussion of the work of artist Sister Corita Kent

Reptaliens are playing at The Hi Hat with HOTT MT and Samira Winter opening

Mute Swan are playing with Young Lovers, Blue Velvet Drapes, Take Pictures, and Birds of Bad Weather at Lot 1 Cafe

Sunday

Spend part of your day enjoying the outdoors and checking out some artwork at the Beverly Hills Art Show (free, also on Saturday)

Once a year for Museums of the Arroyo Day, six museums offer free admission- The Gamble House, Heritage Square, LA Police Museum, Lummis Home, Pasadena Museum of History, and The Autry

Dum Dum Zine’s L.A. Zine Week Kick Off Party is happening at The Hi Hat with performances by Sheer, dimber, Cheekface, Taleen Kali, Magic Wands, live readings, literary prizes and more

Color TV are playing at Junior High with River Gods and The City Hall

Oct 012015
 

Gal Pals- Ex-Marionette

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (10/1-10/4/15)-

Thursday

Craft Night at the Craft and Folk Art Museum has artist Meghan Gordon hosting a night of socializing, drinking and collaborating through
clay.  Objects made will be fired and glazed and picked up at a later date- $8 but make sure to RSVP- http://www.eventbrite.com/e/craftnight-one-night-clay-night-workshop-with-some-times-tickets-18748504281

Art critic and historian Hal Foster is reading from his latest book, Bad New Days at MOCA Grand Ave (free)- http://www.moca.org/program/hal-foster-what-is-contemporary

Gary Numan is performing his album Telekon in its entirety at the Teregram ballroom- http://www.teragramballroom.com/event/887945-gary-numan-performing-los-angeles

Ultimate Painting are playing at the Satellite with Morgan Delt and the Dreamboys- http://www.thesatellitela.com/event/914189-ultimate-painting-feat-james-los-angeles/

LACMA is screening the first two episodes of the second season of the series The Knick for free (with a reserved ticket).There is a reception afterwards- http://www.lacma.org/event/knick-0

Makthaverskan is playing with Roses at The Smell- https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/926327

Friday

Gal Pals are headlining a free show at Acerogami in Pomona- https://www.facebook.com/wearegalpals

The Gaslamp Killer Experience is at the Regent Theater- http://www.theregenttheater.com/event/929245-gaslamp-killer-experience-los-angeles/

THE SIDE PROJECT screening series will be focused on Music & Sound and The Moving Image, “exploring the integration of visuals with music and sound”. Eight short films will be shown with the last one being a virtual reality film. Additional event info here https://www.facebook.com/thesideprojectseries RSVP here- http://www.thesideprojectseries.com/events/

Thievery Corporation are at the Greek Theatre with Cypress Hill- http://www.greektheatrela.com/events/event_details.php?id=3199

Saturday

Learn about screenprinting and make your own print inspired by the excellent Corita Kent exhibition currently on view at the Pasadena Museum of Contemporary Art (free with admission $7 or go metro and pay $5)- http://pmcaonline.org/programs/theres-only-make/

MOCA is hosting a book launch for Outside the Lines, Too: An Inspired and Inventive Coloring Book by Creative Masterminds, with over fifty artists on site to sign the book as well as music by Money Mark and activity/coloring stations- http://www.moca.org/program/book-launch-outside-the-lines-too-an-inspired-and-inventive-coloring-book-by-creative-masterminds

LACMA is having several speakers discuss the themes behind the new exhibition New Objectivity: Modern German Art in the Weimar Republic 1919–1933, including the curator Stephanie Barron- http://www.lacma.org/event/realism-and-modernism

The Bread and Puppet Theater is performing FIRE at Blum & Poe Gallery in Culver City at 7pm (free but limited seating- RSVP)- http://www.blumandpoe.com/content/bread-and-puppet-theater

A Day in the Desert Festival is a concert/music event taking place in an open space in Pioneertown near Joshua Tree. Simian Mobile Disco are headlining the event that takes place all day Saturday, although you can camp there all weekend. $150 is a little steep but it includes food, snacks and yoga. There is a limited capacity of 250 people. The full lineup and more info here- http://www.adayin.org/thedesert/

Night Terrors of 1927 are playing at the Troubadour with Machineheart- http://www.troubadour.com/event/912157-night-terrors-1927-los-angeles/

Saturday and Sunday

Fall 2015 Brewery Art Walk and Open Studios event is a fun way to see artists’ work where they create it. Free entrance and free parking with a beer garden and food as well- https://www.facebook.com/events/1625468024386338/

Sunday

Artist Magdalena Fernández will be speaking with Alma Ruiz about her work in conjunction with her first U.S. solo museum exhibition at MOCA Pacific Design Center (free)- http://www.moca.org/program/art-talk-magdalena-fernandez-and-alma-ruiz

KCRW is hosting the 7th Annual Good Food Pie Contest at the Fowler Museum. Music, pie tasting and more – http://events.kcrw.com/events/2015/10/4/7th-annual-good-food-pie-contest

homeLA is having another site specific dance performance- this time at the foundation of a home at sunset- http://www.homela.org/

Aug 062015
 

Django Django- First Light

Things to do in Los Angeles this weekend (8/6-8/9/15)-

Thursday

Django Django are playing the El Rey Theatre with Beat Connection- http://www.theelrey.com/events/detail/280945

Various Small Fires (VSF) is hosting Subject to Change, a panel discussion “addressing work that escapes its intended institutional frame, and the question of the unforseen audience response” with Andrea Fraser, Amelia Jones,Vanessa Place and Hamza Walker- http://www.vsf.la/vsf-panel-discussion-subject-to-change-with-andrea-fraser-amelia-jones-vanessa-place-hamza-walker/

Ben Browning (of Cut Copy) and DMA’s are at the Santa Monica Pier for Australia Rocks The Pier (free)- http://www.theelrey.com/events/detail/280945

Friday

The Natural History Museum is having an adults only sleepover that for $95 includes a scavenger hunt, DJs, movie screening, open craft beer and wine bar, midnight munchies, and more. It also includes their Summer Nights in the Garden program with access to the VIP lounge- https://tickets.nhm.org/WebStore/shop/ViewItems.aspx?CG=overnight1&C=overnights2

The New Division are playing at Los Globos- http://www.clublosglobos.com/event/894775-new-division-los-angeles/

For Stones Throw 45 Live at Fig at 7th, Peanut Butter Wolf, Dam-Funk, and Mayer Hawthorne will be spinning all 45s and there will be a live performance by Mild High Club (free)- http://www.stonesthrow.com/news/2015/08/figat7th

Saturday

If you missed it last time you have a second chance to see the 24 hour screening of Christian Marclay’s The Clock at LACMA but make sure to check their twitter for wait times, they can be long- http://www.lacma.org/event/clock-2

As part of Sundance Next Fest Rick Alverson’s film Entertainment will be screening at the Ace Hotel Theater and Sharon Van Etten will be performing ($25)- http://www.sundance.org/festivals/next-fest/program/entertainment

At Pasadena Museum of California Art there will be a docent tour of Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent and screenprinting demonstration (free with museum admission) or check out the exhibition for free all day Friday- http://pmcaonline.org/programs/second-saturday-docent-tour-aug8/

Campfireball is happening at The Frog Spot in Frogtown and will have food, drinks, music (starts at 5pm), art, performance and more at 7pm and really that’s as specific as it seems to get (free)- http://www.campfireball.net/#!clickables/ci0d

Also in Frogtown at WCCW– What Trickles Down, What Accumulates: Frogtown- Art and Organizing Against The System is a series of performances, presentations, artwork and an album listening pre-release of WHAT’S WORKING IS BROKEN, “an audio piece composed of personal testimonials of police violence and sounds recorded at protests against LAPD murders”. This event runs from 2:30-9pm with a $10 suggested donation for Youth Justice Coalition- https://www.facebook.com/events/719743424820410/

The Low End Theory Festival still has tickets available for a lineup that includes Flying Lotus, Earl Sweatshirt, Thundercat and more- http://www.shrineauditorium.com/events/detail/275496

Yuna and Aloe Blacc are performing for this week’s Grand Performances at California Plaza (free)- http://www.grandperformances.org/yuna-and-guest

Millionyoung are headlining the Dreamgaze festival at Los Globos- http://www.clublosglobos.com/event/900217-dreamgaze-festival-los-angeles/

Saturday and Sunday

Unique’s Annual Summer Market is back at the California Market Center downtown. $10 gets you entrance for both days and a bunch of amenities- http://www.uniqueusa.com/markets-la

Sunday

Sundance Next Fest continues at the Ace Hotel Theater with a screening of Turbo Kid and DJ sets by Toro y Moi and Neon Indian (limited tickets left)- http://www.sundance.org/festivals/next-fest/program/turbo-kid

The Hammer Museum is hosting The Watts Rebellion: 50 Years Later, a discussion of race relations past and present in the US with Gerald Horne, Brenda E. Stevenson, Johnie H. Scott- http://hammer.ucla.edu/programs-events/2015/08/the-watts-rebellion-50-years-later/

To Live and Dine in LA: A Live Mixtape is a “DJ-driven, multidimensional journey through the menu collection of the
Los Angeles Public Library and shine a light on the issues of food
insecurity currently facing the city” with chef Roy Choi, artist Rakaa Iriscience (Dilated Peoples), and USC professor Josh Kun ($20)- http://www.theregenttheater.com/event/903959-live-dine-in-l-live-los-angeles/

Ciclavia is back- this time its Culver City to Venice- http://www.ciclavia.org/